How do you manage demand effectively?

Take a number?

You don’t manage demand.

You can’t manage demand.

It’s not a powerful question to ask because it’s not within anyone’s capacity to carry out.

When our customers line up and take a number to make their requests of us, demand simply is. Though we may have processes in place to manage our limited resources, we should never be confused that we’re actually managing demand.

As long as people have concerns to care for, there will always be demand. As long as technology can help take care of some of those concerns, technologists will never have enough capacity to take care of everyone.

Demand management and portfolio management

Demand management is a philosophical orientation toward IT governance, mostly about portfolio management.

As we inventory all the projects we might take on, we call that a portfolio. As we decide what we’ll do, set priorities and allocate resources (human, financial, equipment and other forms of capital), we call that portfolio management. It is an important and powerful management practice that aligns with the most basic constraints we face.

Where “demand management” enters into the picture, it represents a philosophical shift from our real constraint to the external market. IT claims to “manage demand” because our resources are always insufficient, and we know that we have to say “no” to some requests that come in. By saying “no”, we say we are managing [read constraining or governing] demand.

Only we’re not. The demand is still there. We’re just saying it’s beyond our capacity to cover. We put management-speak around our philosophy, perhaps so that it’s less confrontational or makes us feel better?

Fundamental mechanisms of demand

Rather than jump to the opposite extreme and suggest we stop saying “no”, let’s first make some assertions about demand and our capacity to handle it:

  1. IT resources are always limited, relative to demand
  2. Outside of strategic capital investments in IT, working to “keep the lights on” (email, hardware, software, infrastructure, service desk, phones, etc.) consumes much of the IT budget
  3. Customer needs do not go away just because we can’t handle all requests

You can't argue with fundamental mechanisms

You see, customer demand also originates in similar fundamental mechanisms: everyone needs help, they also have limited resources, and eventually if they don’t take care of their own concerns they start to suffer until they take action… and that action might not involve us in the way we prefer.

If you add to these the concern that rapid technology shifts overtake some IT professionals, causing them to gradually either 1) focus on smaller domains, 2) become generalists or 3) lose competitive advantages as the market drifts, it strains our capacity to consistently keep up with customer demand more every day.

As a result, a notion that we can manage demand seems both reasonable and attractive. It is important, however, to stay grounded in the fact that we can’t do everything and we aren’t doing everything… so if the demand is high enough, our customers will look elsewhere for the help they need.

Those environments where IT believes they manage demand but also work to prevent customers from going outside for help create “the perfect storm” for marginalizing the value of IT and prompting quick business responses to outsource the function.

How demand management impacts trust

I have written of trust in many other places. Remember for the purposes of this blog that we distinguish trust as “an assessment of our sincerity, reliability and competence to hold our promises […for as long as we need to].” I also shared the observation of a marketing expert who said they have been waiting for an IT project that has been three months from shipping for over 18 months!

It happens. It isn’t pretty. But what does it say for sincerity, reliability and competence?

If we believe the answer is demand management, and demand management ultimately means cutting back on the work we promise to do, then maybe we hope to increase trust by making fewer promises? That would make sense if it were the end of the story.

You see, if IT has a history of failing to deliver, we break trust… and if we make fewer promises, we lose opportunities to build trust. AND if we do both… we lose on both ends.

So what do we do?

The rational answer, it seems to me, is to first accept that demand management is a philosophical orientation. It is not right or wrong, but it shapes how we think and act with regard to our customers and our “competitors” (those to whom they turn when we say “no”, as we must).

Next we need to look for a more effective philosophy that focuses on what we CAN do.

Don't confuse this with the power of positive thinking...

We have to start by making make sure to hold our promises while ALSO making as many as we can keep. We make them clearly, and we work to build a new tradition with our customers of saying yes and delivering – consistently, recurrently and with optimal business value… all the time. Rinse, and repeat.

When we say “yes”, we don’t say yes to everything (which breaks trust), but yes to what we can do with our limited resources.

Let’s change the philosophy from “managing [governing or constraining] demand” to “managing [taking responsibility for] the value we produce”.

We can’t manage demand anyway… we can only manage the promises we make and what we deliver with the resources at our disposal.

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Team players and MVPs

Team players (yes, these two are mine...)

What are the qualities you look for in a “team player”? Respect? Experience? Competence? Levelheadedness? A great personality?

When I hear people use the phrase, I confess I don’t know what they really mean. That is, I know it is a common phrase, but I wonder if people give the jargon any thought.

Sometimes it seems people use the words when they really just wants someone else to change… as in “he/she is not a very good team player”. Yet they offer no (or little) direction on precisely how to become one.

Have you ever met a “team player” you didn’t like to work with? Have you ever seen the term “team player” used in quotes, besides in this post? Ever?

Putting the jargon aside, who do you want on your teams?

Standardization, commonality and best practices

Every project includes some fundamental tasks. Sometimes they are repeatable, even mechanical, and you can train people to do them. You can often anticipate contingencies, and you can teach people to recognize them and act appropriately when they arise.

To that extent, you can train people and substitute them into teams as backups or replacements. So we cross-train on each others’ jobs to provide backup for people to go on vacations. We define standard practices and “best practices” and teach them to people to drop our costs of repeating the same tasks over and again.

Now, the last thing we need is somebody on the team who messes up our routines every day. The person who habitually “breaks the build” or who fails to write unit tests forces his teammates to bear added costs to keep everything running smoothly, until eventually we start to wonder how we can get those people off our team.

So the factors that help us work together in standard practices are one thing that makes us good “team players”.

But that is not the end of the story…

Marginal utility in the team

Not everybody takes the tiller

This post is the fourth in the principles of economics in software development series. We are pausing for a time on the third of Greg Mankiw’s principles, which says “rational people think at the margin“.

Last week I wrote about the implications of this principle on the value of our work (and our salaries). As an illustration, I suggested the difference between the professional basketball player’s income and the amateur’s income might come down to four extra baskets per game.

They’re paid all the extra money because of the incremental points they score.

Now, nobody asked them to score those points in high school or college. Nobody forced them to practice. Nobody read their job description to them.

They did the work. They built their abilities. They found ways to produce value for their teams… and they earned their rewards.

For that, they were not easily replaced. For that, they could compel a little VIP status. For that, they sometimes got out of hand, acted like prima donnas and started producing high costs for their employers (and themselves).

Thinking at the margin doesn’t discriminate

So while there are marginal utilities, which produce marginal value… there are also marginal costs.

“Rational people think at the margin” means nobody worries about what is the same. All “team players” who follow standard practices and never step out of line, but never produce incremental value over their coworkers may feel “safe”… whatever that means to them. But they can never be valued any more than what is commonplace (…and there is nothing wrong with that).

Hire this guy? The most interesting guy in the world...

On the other hand, rational people evaluate the costs associated with picking up those few extra points in a basketball game… with adding that expert to their team, along with any eccentricities they bring. The person who has that unique knowledge of a technology or who can make the database “sing”, but who may not perfectly fit in some other way, might be just what is missing.

They evaluate whether it’s “worth it” – worth the costs in terms of time, energy, money and lost opportunities. And then they willingly make investments to get access to all the difference in the world, if it will help them achieve their tactical, strategic or ultimate objectives.

So let me ask again… who do you want on your teams?